Lifetime of William Shakespear. Evaluation of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Macbeth Track

Lifetime of William Shakespear. Evaluation of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Macbeth Track Evaluation of Shakespeare’s Macbeth

The moment of redemption was able to actually regain the two kingdoms and allow Queen Elizabeth to reign. Actually I was expecting for Richmond to be the new king and yet I find the ending fitting considering that many had died with a man having a thirst of power.
What I did not like about the play was how Richard was allowed to escape from his crimes. I could not believe that the Duchess, Richard’s mother was unable to even impose discipline to her son considering she knows her son’s misbehavior. It seems that his thirst for power has escalated to the point of even trying to kill his own mother. I was terribly angry with Richard for planning to kill everybody even those who could not afford to defend themselves.  I feel sorry for King Richard’s mother.

Lifetime of William Shakespear. Contrast of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Macbeth Piece of music

Lifetime of William Shakespear. Contrast of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Macbeth Piece of music Macbeth Piece of music

 A unique characteristic of history plays is their overt didacticism, that is, their preoccupation in using historical events (some of which are tragic) to teach moral lessons fit for the present time. This is made obvious by the absolutism in the characterization of leading men in Henry Iv (Part I). This is a plot device used to compartmentalize perception of the characters. For example, Prince Harry was the epitome of a good king-to-be: wise, valiant and strong. On the other hand, the knight Falstaff was the epitome of vice and deception. In a similar vein, King Henry IV was the epitome of what Prince Harry was not; in fact, it is arguable that his characterization—guilt-ridden, lacking in mental fortitude, wanting in accomplishment—was all so Harry’s virtuosity and character would stand out so sharply in contrast.

Life of William Shakespear. Comparing of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Macbeth Music

Life of William Shakespear. Comparing of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Macbeth Music Comparing of Shakespeare’s Macbeth

And this resonates with Antony’s characterization in the text: true to his title of Roman hero, he was devoted to his king and country and was acknowledged for it. But at the same time, he was loyal to his love for Cleopatra. His station cannot be branded in simple terms of loyalty/disloyalty, because he was truly loyal to both, only that he wavered in-between loyalties one too many times. Antony wanted the best of both worlds, and those worlds were at odds; as W.H. Auden put it, “The tragedy is not that it happens, but that we do not accept it” (2002).

Life of William Shakespear. Comparability of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Macbeth Melody

Life of William Shakespear. Comparability of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Macbeth Melody Life of William Shakespear

So would ensue his tragedy; plagued by divided allegiances, Antony was repaid by betrayal by Octavian and Cleopatra. His final words were indicative of his cessation from his own worldliness, and a return to his former heroism, signaling the completion of his end of the tragedy: “Not cowardly put off my helmet to / My countryman—a Roman by a Roman / Valiantly vanquished” (Crowther). History Plays
History plays different from tragedies, although they might share the same historical subject matter. First, history plays are concerned with narration of a historical event; whereas tragedies are centered on conflict and resolution between characters, history plays are generally more concerned with plot and progression.

Life of William Shakespear. Assessment of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Macbeth Tune

Life of William Shakespear. Assessment of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Macbeth Tune Macbeth

The format is essentially as follows: the tragic hero is the greatest recipient of change at the play’s end; he is typically the epitome of virtue and/or strength, and is accompanied by unparalleled greatness. However, his life takes a turn for the worse because he commits a tragic flaw, which will unfold the tragedy in his life. At the play’s end, the hero may/may not regain his previous status, but he recovers his moral core, or at least corrects his tragic flaw.  In Antony and Cleopatra, Antony’s tragic flaw is never singled out by the text. But W.H. Auden dentifies it as “worldliness—the love of pleasure, success, art, ourselves, and conversely, the fear of boredom, failure, being ridiculous, being on the wrong side, dying” (241).



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